27 August 2008

Should You Tell Your Doctor You're Bi?


Writer, bisexual activist, Woman-Stirred member and disabled/retired Harvard-and-Yale-trained physician Jan Steckel speaks to the question of coming out to your health care provider. Should you do it? What are the consequences of telling or not telling your doctor about the gender of your sexual or life partner(s)?

Not only can prejudice or simple ignorance about sexual orientation hurt the quality of your care – it can affect who is allowed to visit you when you’re in the hospital. On the other hand, keeping your health care provider in the dark about your sexual preference can get you absurdly or dangerously inappropriate care. All of this may determine whom you choose to tell what when you step inside the medical system.

Jan Steckel has a BA summa cum laude in Creative Writing from Harvard and was a member of the Radcliffe Lesbians Society. She has an MD from Yale School of Medicine, where she was a member of Lambda. She became a member of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics while she was taking care of field workers’ children at a county hospital in California. As a pediatrician taking care of low-income immigrant children for Kaiser-Permanente, she taught a continuing Medical Education class in Culturally Competent Care for LGBT Patients and Their Families. She also helped copy-edit the Kaiser Permanente Handbook on the subject. She has dropped her membership in all “Gay and Lesbian” societies whose names and agendas don’t include bisexuals.

She has written for biMagazine, Harrington Lesbian Literary Quarterly, Bellevue Literary Review, Yale Medicine, Scholastic Magazine and many other publications. Her poetry chapbook The Underwater Hospital is available from Zeitgeist Press and Amazon.com. Her story "Mixing Tracks" won the 2008 Gertrude Press Fiction Chapbook Contest for LGBT writing and will be published as a slim book in several months. You can find out more about her at www.jansteckel.com.

So join Merry Gangemi, this Thursday, August 28th, 4 to 6 p.m.(Eastern time) for Woman-Stirred Radio: the best in Queer culture.

Our phone lines are always open. Call 802 454-7762 to join the conversation. Tell us about your own experiences with the medical system.

Woman-Stirred Radio is a queer cultural journal that celebrates and preserves the lives and work of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered artists, musicians, writers, academics and policy makers.

We broadcast live on WGDR every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews and music; plus weekly commentaries from British writer Nicki Hastie and guest commentaries from Julie R. Enszer, and Jan Steckel. Our intern is Mikhael Yowe, an IBA student at Goddard College.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.

20 August 2008

Angie Evans

It's not often one comes across a young artist/singer-songwriter with the ability to create a truly unique sound and mix it with empowering, insightful lyrics that leave you groping for more. Angie Evans combines folk, soul, jazz, and funk as if they were meant to be together. Her lyrics and voice speak of love, sex, passion, and consciousness.

Born in the suburbs of Northern California, Angie started playing guitar at seventeen and within a year wrote her first song and began performing for her friends. She earned a BA in creative writing with a minor Womyn's Studies at Cal State University Long Beach. It was there, after finding the wonders of Womyn's studies, sociology, politics and the literature of ethnic and female writers, that she began to believe in the greater good of the poetic and political word. All while discovering the beauty in conscious hip hop, soul and funk music, she began to find a voice that was the perfect fit in content and vibration.

Angie Evans has performed at countless venues ranging from coffee shops to college campuses in Long Beach and the greater Los Angeles area, at events for various feminist, LGBTQ and women-centered causes, and Angie has been a featured performer at the Michigan Womyns Music Festival (2008), Estrogen Fest (2008), Fort Wayne, Indiana Pride Festival (2008), UC Irvine Queer Fest (2008), San Diego Pride Festival (2006), Long Beach Pride Festival (2005/2006), Ladyfest San Diego (2005), Ladyfest Las Vegas (2006), Phoenix, Arizona Pride Festival (2007/2008), MODELS OF PRIDE (2006), RAISE UP & SHOUT (2007) and at Whiskey A Go Go in West Hollywood, The Mint, in LA, The Temple Bar, in Santa Monica, & BB King's, in Hollywood.

Angie has built a strong local and national fan bases. Since 2005, Angie has been regularly performing with her band: Elliot Lawrence (bass & backup vocals); Natalie Martin (drums & backup vocals); Chi Austin (sax); and Greg Rutledge (keyboards). The band recorded Angie's debut album Cycle of Fruit late 2007; it was released May 10, 2008 on the Independent Freedom Tribe label.

"My music is not just for me," Angie says. "It is for those who listen."

Angie believes in sisterhood, pride, good espresso, handmade organic bar soap, pino grigio on a cold day, green vegetables, and using the Fword as much as possible.

Say it with me: FEMINISM, FEMINISM, FEMINIST!

To purchase Angie's debut album Cycle of Fruit visit Angie's web site or her Myspace

So join Merry Gangemi, this Thursday, August 14th, 4 to 6 p.m. for Woman-Stirred Radio: the best in Queer culture.

Our phone lines are always open. Call 802 454-7762 to join the conversation.

Woman-Stirred Radio is a queer cultural journal that celebrates and preserves the lives and work of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered artists, musicians, writers, academics and policy makers.

We broadcast live on WGDR every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews and music; plus weekly commentaries from British writer Nicki Hastie and guest commentaries from Julie R. Enszer, and Jan Steckel. Our intern is Mikhael Yowe, an IBA student at Goddard College.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.

13 August 2008

Furious Improvisation


Please join Merry Gangemi and Woman-stirred Radio, this Thursday, August 14th, for an in-depth interview with Susan Quinn, author of Furious Improvisation: How the WPA and a Cast of Thousands Made High Art out of Desperate Times.

Hallie Flanagan,the director of the Federal Theatre Project turned a WPA relief program into a platform for some of the most cutting edge theatre of its time, propelling a unique experiment of U.S. government support of the arts to heights of creativity, ingenuity, pragmatism, and social justice. The story of the Federal Theatre Project includes actors, writers, and producers, such as Orson Wells, John Houseman, Sinclair Lewis, as well as Leonard de Paur, Rose McClendon, Asadata Dafora Horton, Canada Lee, Edna Thomas, and Jack Carter.

In Furious Improvisation, Susan Quinn brings to life the challenges of the Depression and the innovation, risks, and triumphs of Hallie Flanagan, Eleanor Roosevelt, FDR, and Harry Hopkins to use art as a means to get millions of unemployed, hungry Americans back to work and offering drama, music, and comedy to millions of Americans who were desperate for hope and comfort.

Furious Improvisation is also a story of the Federal Theatre Project's struggles against racism, classism, despair, bigotry, and ultra-conservative attacks from the Hearst Corporation newspapers, the Midwest, Roman Catholic pro-Hitler priest cum radio host, Father Charles Coughlin, and the fascist, pro-Nazi Black Legion.

The book is better than vivid and engrossing; it is a panorama of details and personalities, and snatches of conversations that will make you laugh out loud. Furious Improvisation is also a book that brings home to us all the importance of community, self-reliance, dignity, and kindness. Here is an excerpt:

On inauguration day, Hallie Flanagan joined the throng heading up to Capital Hill to hear President Roosevelt lay out his agenda for his second term in office. Some of what he said that day may have reassured Hallie that he hadn't forgotten the people who elected him. As the rain poured down on the audience and swept into the inaugural pavilion, Roosevelt spoke eloquently...of those "who at this very moment are denied the greater part of what the very lowest standards of today call the necessities of life...I see one-third of a nation ill-housed, ill-clad, ill-nourished," he told the audience. "...The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little."


Too bad George Bush doesn't read; he might learn something from Susan Quinn's excellent and important history of just one hand of the New Deal.

So please, join us, this Thursday, August 14th, 4 to 6 p.m. for Woman-Stirred Radio: the best in Queer culture.

Our phone lines are always open. Call 802 454-7762 to join the conversation.

Woman-Stirred Radio is a queer cultural journal that celebrates and preserves the lives and work of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered artists, musicians, writers, academics and policy makers.

We broadcast live on WGDR every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews and music; plus weekly commentaries from British writer Nicki Hastie and guest commentaries from Julie R. Enszer, and Jan Steckel. Our intern is Mikhael Yowe, an IBA student at Goddard College.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.