26 March 2009

Alicia Ostriker is Woman-Stirred!!


Alicia Ostriker
is a major American poet and critic. Twice nominated for a National Book Award, she is author of eleven volumes of poetry, most recently No Heaven (2005). As a critic Ostriker is the author of two pathbreaking volumes on women’s poetry, Writing Like a Woman and Stealing the Language: The Emergence of Women’s Poetry in America. Her most recent critical book is Dancing at the Devil’s Party: Essays on Poetry, Politics and the Erotic. She has also published three books on the Bible, Feminist Revision and the Bible, the controversial The Nakedness of the Fathers; Biblical Visions and Revisions, a combination of prose and poetry that re-imagines the Bible from the perspective of a contemporary Jewish woman, and most recently, For the Love of God: the Bible as an Open Book.

Ostriker’s poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Antaeus, The Nation, Poetry, American Poetry Review, Kenyon Review, The Atlantic, MS, Tikkun, and many other journals, and have been widely anthologized. Her poetry and essays have been translated into French, German, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew and Arabic. She has lectured and given performances of her work throughout the USA, as well as in Europe, Australia, Israel, Japan and China.

Ostriker has received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Poetry Society of America, the San Francisco State Poetry Center, the Judah Magnes Museum, the New Jersey Arts Council, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. She lives in Princeton, NJ with her husband. Ostriker is Professor Emerita of Rutgers University and is a faculty member of the Drew University Low-Residency Poetry MFA Program. Ostriker has taught in the Princeto University Creative Writing Program and in Toni Morrison’s Atelier Program. She has taught midrash writing workshops in the USA, Israel, England and Australia.

So tune in on Thursday, March 26th at 4:15 pm (eastern) for a fascinating conversation with Alicia Ostriker.

Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR (91.1 fm) and online at wgdr.org every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews, music, and guest commentaries from bi-activist Jan Steckel, British writer Nicki Hastie, and lesbian literary historian and poet, Julie R. Enszer.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.

10 March 2009

Ben Binstock and JD Glass on Woman-Stirred Radio

This week on Woman-Stirred Radio, at 4:15 (eastern), Merry Gangemi interviews art historian Ben Binstock, author of the book Vermeer's Family Secrets, an exploration of the life and work of the seventeenth-century Dutch painter, Johannes Vermeer, best known for his iconic painting, Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Vermeer was relatively unknown until the he was "discovered" in the mid-nineteenth century. Vermeer's Family Secrets
details the painter's complex technical achievements by tracing sources and influences.

Vermeer's Family Secrets
is the first painting-by-painting, year-by-year study and analysis of the artist's oeuvre, integrating Vermeer's relationship to his wife and her family with his development as an painter with the profound technical influences of his predecessors, Rembrandt and Carel Fabritius.

Binstock reveals through research and scholarship that Vermeer's daughter Maria was both his apprentice and his successor and that at least seven paintings, originally thought to be Vermeer's, were actually painted by Maria.

Benjamin Binstock holds a Ph.D. in art history from Columbia University. He has studied in Aix-en-Provence, Berkley, CA, Berlin, and Amsterdam.
He was a v
isiting member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and the American Academy in Berlin. He has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and CUNY. Binstock is presently teaching at Cooper Union in Manhattan.

Then, at 5:00, JD Glass returns to Woman-Stirred Radio to talk about her new novel, X, set in an accelerated cyberpunk world of love, betrayal, and political intrigue.

What is fascinating about X is its implications in the broader context of gender and power within queer culture. It is an intense and chilling schema of where the soul of America has gone in this post-9/11 world.

A Lambda Literary nominee, JD Glass is the author of American Goth, Punk and Zen, Red Light, and Punk Like Me. JD Glass lives in Staten island, and when she's not writing or surfing, she's playing music with her band, Life Underwater, or doing her job as an EMT in New York City.

Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR (91.1 fm) and online at wgdr.org every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews, music, and guest commentaries from bi-activist Jan Steckel, British writer Nicki Hastie, and lesbian literary historian and poet, Julie R. Enszer.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.

6 March 2009

Raising the Status of Little Magazines

Last week I discovered a research project within the University I work at which seemed to be inviting my attention more than most: The Little Magazines Project.

So tomorrow I'm heading back into literary research territory to attend an English Research Symposium entitled Interaction, Symbiosis, Overlap: Little Magazines and Small Presses.

Little magazines and small presses are defined as "those which publish creative work in literature (poetry especially) and the other arts, with little or no regard for commercial gain, in the form of journals, on the one hand, and books or pamphlets on the other. They often provide an outlet for work that might be seen as exploring or pushing at the boundaries of its given medium."

Isn't this the stuff that Woman-Stirred poets feed on? Isn't it these little magazines which keep us poets motivated, as sources of inspiration and possible publication?

During the day-long symposium, key magazines and presses in the field of innovative poetry will be looked at as case studies of literary experimentation. Then, in the afternoon, there's a session to really make me sit up and take notice: the importance of little magazines and small presses in exploring gender politics. Gay Liberation literary magazines will be one of the topics discussed.

So, with all of this on my doorstep, I'm hoping there might be a space for me to celebrate lesbian poetry and the little magazines which have nurtured this work over the last few decades. I won't be alone. Julie R. Enszer is already engrossed in this work through the Lesbian Poetry Archive. And just this week on the Lesbian Writers listserv a call was put out by one list member for examples of feminist magazines of any size.

Lesbian culture and literary history has evolved inside little magazines and small presses. Perhaps there are ways we can all link up to add and contribute to The Little Magazines Project. After all, the research team would especially welcome additional information about any little magazines from editors, contributors, scholars, librarians and enthusiasts. Can we help?

3 March 2009

Maxine Kumin on Woman-Stirred Radio



Please welcome Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, Maxine Kumin to Woman-Stirred Radio, this Thursday, March 5th, at 4:15 pm (eastern). We are going to discuss her latest book of poems, Still to Mow.

Kumin is the author of sixteen books of poetry,including Poems of New England, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1972. Kumin has written five novels and two short story collections, as well as essays, and a memoir, Inside the Halo and beyond: The Anatomy of a Recovery.

Maxine Kumin’s new volume of poems, Still to Mow is both the lyrical description of an altered American landscape and a complex chronicle of her exploration of experience and knowledge as an elder American woman in the age of Peak Oil. Kumin seamlessly connects the dots in lyric self-revelation and insight and casts an eye on America’s delusion that we are somehow more evolved than any other people.

So tune in or stream it live at WGDR.org.

Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR 91.1 fm and online at wgdr.org every Thursday afternoon from 4 to 6 p.m. (eastern), with interviews and music; plus commentaries from British writer Nicki Hastie and guest commentaries from Julie R. Enszer, and Jan Steckel.

Woman-Stirred Radio is funded in part by the Samara Foundation of Vermont, a non-profit, Burlington-based foundation that seeks to improve the quality of life for Vermont's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. Click on the link to find out more about Samara Foundation and its programs.