16 April 2014

We're Here, We're Queer and We Farm !! Out Here: a documentary about the hearts and hard work of queer farmers in the US


I'm excited to welcome Jonah Mossberg to Woman-Stirred Radio. Jonah is a film- director and queer farmer and has produced a documentary film about queer farmers across the U.S. 

It's a film that rocks the plow when it comes to traditional notions of farmers and farming. How exactly does queer farming impact our ever-changing systems of macro and micro food production? Why is it important to identify the impact of queer farmers?  

How exactly does queer farming impact our ever-chnging systems of macro and micro food production?
Why is it important to identify the impact of queer farmers?  

So, if you are thinking: big, strapping, clean-cut farmer smelling of fresh hay, or your stereotypical Auntie Em shooing chickens in a well-worn housedress, think again! Because, what after all, does it all mean, Mrs. Robinson?

Tune in Thursday April 17th at 5 p.m. and find out. In the meantime, we'll play some appropriate tunes in the 4:00 hour until Jonah comes on line.



Nice Garlic!!
Jonah Mossberg is a queer farmer from Northeastern Connecticut. Jonah holds a B.A. in Latin American Studies and Studio Art from Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. Jonah co-curated Dirtstar 2010: Nightsoil, an event at the 2010 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco and is a founding member of The Rainbow Chard Alliance, a growing national network of queer farmers and gardeners. For three years Jonah taught gardening to public middle school students at Alice Waters’ revolutionary Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, California. Jonah is a proud seed saver, forager, beekeeper, and aspiring surfer. Most recently, Jonah lived and farmed in rural Northern California before his Saturn Return drew him back to the East Coast to farm just outside his hometown. Out Here is Jonah’s first film project.


So please tune your dial locally to 91.1 or 91.7 fm or stream us live at WGDR.org.

                        Phone lines are open at 802 454.7762. 


 



Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR 91.1 fm and WGDH 91.7 fm, Goddard College's community radio station located in Plainfield, Vermont.




   



3 April 2014

Judith Witherow on Woman-Stirred Radio Today

Judith K. Witherow (photo by Sue Lenaerts)
Today on Woman-Stirred Radio, I am delighted and honored to welcome Judith Witherow back to the show. Witherow is one of the most feisty, smart, and compassionately in-your-face lesbian-feminists I've ever known.

To wit, she is a poet, essayist, and storyteller. A mixed-blood, two-spirit (lesbian), Native American Irish woman raised in rural Appalachian poverty.  Witherow writes about her life experiences with disability, gender, sexual orientation, race and class from a perspective influenced by her early heritage.

Judith's attentions to feminist issues were always encapsulated by her greater understanding of class and race. Following  the initial excitement of the women's movement was the disillusionment that newly won 'rights'  were for middle-class women who wanted an equal arena with men. very little has changed for women of her background"  (Strong Enough to Bend, p 163).

Judith Witherow speaks truth to power in ways that make us squirm and make us question,  and in the squirming and the questioning we find out what is authentic and what is distraction or opportunistic.

Now, more than ever, class is the elephant in the living room and the rhetorical bullshit tossed around because, let's face it, American individualism is really all about me-me-me and our immediate interests---unless of course there's a catastrophe and we all weep and wail to ease out collective conscience.

Witherow's new book of essays, Strong Enough to Bend, is hot off the press, and if you want to read something with teeth and discover an essayist bursting with insight, passion, humor, and plain-speaking, check it out. Click on the link and grab a copy.  You won't regret the effort!

And call in to the air studio! Join the conversation! Ask questions and offer your thoughts. That's why we're here on Woman-Stirred Radio. For the women, for the lesbians, for the listeners.

802.454.7762




   

    Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR
    91.1 fm and WGDH 91.7 fm, Goddard College's
    community radio station  located in Plainfield,
    Vermont.
   

27 March 2014

Annie Lanzilotto on Woman-Stirred








This week on Woman-Stirred Radio, I welcome Anne Rachele Lanzillotto back to the show. Lanzilotto's memoir,
 L  is For  Lion (SUNY Press, 2013), is a Lambda finalist in the lesbian memoir category.

Last time Annie was here we talked about L is For Lion, but Lanzilotto is also a poet, rocker, performance artist, and activist.  Click here for her website and links to her blogs.

She is the songwriter and vocalist of the albums Blue HPill, Eleven Recitations, and Carry My Coffee. Click the link for her Soundcloud page.

Lanzilotto has a voice to be reckoned with: bold and brashly elegant. Her music is punk, her poetry is gorgeous, and her performance art poignant and compelling. Her work is infused with wisdom and compassion, and her voice is clearly and unmistakably lesbian-feminist----something the lesbian community might want to pay attention to in this  new age of millennial queerness. Lanzilotto holds a BA with honors in medical anthropology from Brown University and an MFA in writing from Sarah Laurence College.


  


Her poem, "Triple Bypass" won the Italian American Writers Association Paolucci Award in Poetry, and was published in the anthology, The Milk of Almonds: Italian-American Women Writers on Food and Culture. 

Her poems, "Manhattan Schist" and "My Grandmother's Hands" both won Rose and John Petracca Awards second place from Philadelphia Poets.

Her book of poetry, Schistsong was released by Bordighere Press, in 2013.

Lanzilotto made her acting debut in 1993 with her solo shows, Confessions of a Bronx Tomboy: My Throwing Arm, This Useless Expertise, at Under One Roof Theatre and Manhattan Class Company, in NYC.

So please tune your dial locally to 91.1 or 91.7 fm or stream us live at WGDR.org.

                        Phone lines are open at 802 454.7762. 







   



Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR 91.1 fm and WGDH 91.7 fm, Goddard College's community radio station located in Plainfield, Vermont.


   



   






13 March 2014


4:15   

This afternoon, I welcome Jess Wells, [originally scheduled for February 27th] whose historical fiction underscores the brilliance and grit of the women of the Middle Ages, who dared to challenge the power and might of the Roman Catholic Church and fought for the right to learn to read, train for a profession, craft,  or trade, and persevered and sometimes triumphed in spite of overwhelming odds.

“Jess Wells (The Mandrake Broom) has mastered the art of the immersive historical, exemplified by her latest release from Fireship Press, A Slender Tether .... Brilliantly conceived and perfectly executed, A Slender Tether is an engaging, rewarding read. Highly recommended” – Jerry Wheeler, in Out in Print


“Wells has spun this woman's tale into an intriguing and engrossing story that will set readers seeking more… Wells has an incredible ability to teach without diatribe, tells an wickedly engrossing tale full of empathy (and, in this case, more than a little sympathy), and knows her history cold. Jess Wells is just bloody brilliant. Go. Buy. Read” (Nathan Burgoine writing on RedRoom.com)

“This extraordinary trio of stories …celebrate human ingenuity, resourcefulness, and resilience. The writing is sure, the voice arresting and original. Places come alive; the seasons are painted skillfully, there for the reader to experience… Highly recommended to readers interested in the lives of medieval people who were neither royalty nor members of the nobility, and who are all the more individual and interesting for that”— Tinney S. Heath





5:00     I am thrilled to  welcome the Woodbury Bully Busters! 

Five 6th-graders from Woodbury Elementary School (WES) have worked with me and  Jackie Batten (WGDR training coordinator) to produce this special program about bullying.  The kids examine and discuss why bullies bully, the difference between bullying and teasing "or kidding around,"  danger signs and zones, and how to be safe at school and on the school bus.

Interviewers Dylan Burke and Owen Charleston,  audio editor Kate Gallant,  producer Xavier Hart Marion, and director Mac Lanphear have created timely  and valuable public-service programming for both kids and adults.

While consumer-celebrity pop culture generates unrealistic and inappropriate behavior models for children, listeners will hear a common thread woven throughout the kids' narratives and discussions---children look to parents and teachers to protect them.

As director of the Woodbury Community Library, a small rural library and community resource shared by the WES---and the greater Woodbury community,  the origins of the project grew out of brainstorming how better to connect our community, school, and library.  Any doubts about the project evaporated once I met with this amazing group of students. They are witty, kind, thoughtful, empathetic, honest, and very very capable!!

In addition to working with WGDR's Jackie Batten, the kids learned about principles of broadcasting, the history of radio, and the social and cultural importance of radio broadcasting. Dylan, Mac, Kate, Owen, and Xavier trained on state-of-the-art recording and broadcast equipment, worked pre- and post-production, were introduced and quickly mastered audio editing software, and worked together as a team, discussing and deciding how to create a show that would have meaning and value.

I want to thank all who helped out in this venture, in particular: Noreen Slavin, administrator at WES, Mollie Dawson, the 5th and 6th grade teacher at WES, Amy Masse, principal and instructional leader of WES, Heather Lanphear, a parent extraordinaire,  most efficient student transportation maven and trustee of the Woodbury Community Library, and from WGDR,  the most terrific Jackie Batten,  programmer Jeff Lindholm (Geezer Rock) who graciously shared studio time with the students,  and operations manager David Ferland,  who keeps it all running like a well-oiled machine.

So gather the family around the radio this afternoon and tune in to WGDR's Woman-Stirred Radio and help celebrate the great work these smart, astute, thoughtful, and fun-loving students will share with you. Our phone lines will be open for comments and questions so don't be shy. 802 454-7762 or email merrygangemi@gmail.com.






Merry Gangemi (photo by Devi Lockwood)




Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR 91.1 fm and  WGDH 91.7 fm, 
Goddard College's community radio station
in Plainfield, Vermont. 






 
  

6 March 2014

Mary Fahl is Woman-Stirred!

This week, on Thursday, March 6th, at 4:15 (eastern), I'm thrilled to welcome singer, songwriter, and actress Mary Fahl, who first achieved critical acclaim as lead singer and co-founder of October Project (click here to listen to Fahl performing "Return to Me").

"As a solo artist, Fahl's musical inspirations have expanded to include classical, medieval, and world music. Her expressive, transcendent voice has been called 'a voice for the gods' (Boston Globe), 'a powerful, beautifully proportioned contralto' (Variety), 'soul-permeating' (Portland Press), and 'supernatural' (author Anne Rice). [Fahl's] music appeals to a wide range of musical enthusiasts, including a large, loyal fan base of Mary Fahl evangelists" (M:MMusic).

Actually, the Portland Press critic wrote: "It is hard not to fall for this Mary and her soul-permeating voice."

Mary Fahl (photo by Lisa Hancock)
Fahl's latest album and new music in the WGDR/WGDH air studio is Love and Gravity, a splendid collection of ten new songs---described as "folk-etched ballads, which includes two pre-released singles, an inspiring re-imagining of the Joni Mitchell classic, 'Both Sides Now' and Fahl's tribute to 9/11 rescue workers 'Dawning of the Day,' set to a traditional Irish melody, and 'Exiles' the theme song for the audiobook version of Anne Rice's The Wolves of Midwinter.

"Fahl describes Love and Gravity as a "meditative record about finding love later in life while maintaining a sense of optimism and chaos" (M:Mmusic).

So please tune in to Woman-Stirred Radio for a real-time interview with Mary Fahl. 4:15. Thursday. March 6th.

Want to join the conversation---or do you have a question for Mary? Call the air-studio at 802.454.7762 or email me at merrygangemi@gmail.com.






Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR   91.1 fm and WGDH 91.7 fm, Goddard College's community radio station located in Plainfield, Vermont. 

27 February 2014

Witches and the Church :: Jess Wells :: The Mandrake Broom and A Slender Tether


4:00    Let's talk about women and the church and listen as Leslie Wilkin, Ellie Gordon-Moershel, and Amanda Chalmers speak with Heather Frayne about the image of women in the creation myth, the persecution of women as witches, the Catholic school system, and developing feminist consciousness within a Christian community. Hosted by Nicole Deagan, this program was originally aired on Vancouver Co-op Radio CFRO 102.7.

5:00     I welcome Jess Wells, whose historical fiction underscores the brilliance and grit of Middle Age women who dared to challenge the power and might of the Roman Catholic Church.

“Jess Wells (The Mandrake Broom) has mastered the art of the immersive historical, exemplified by her latest release from Fireship Press, A Slender Tether .... Brilliantly conceived and perfectly executed, A Slender Tether is an engaging, rewarding read. Highly recommended.” – Jerry Wheeler, in Out in Print

“Wells has spun this woman's tale into an intriguing and engrossing story that will set readers seeking more… Wells has an incredible ability to teach without diatribe, tells a wickedly engrossing tale full of empathy (and, in this case, more than a little sympathy), and knows her history
cold. Jess Wells is just bloody brilliant. Go. Buy. Read.” – ‘Nathan Burgoine writing on RedRoom.com

“This extraordinary trio of stories …celebrate human ingenuity, resourcefulness, and resilience. The writing is sure, the voice arresting and original. Places come alive; the seasons are painted skillfully, there for the reader to experience… Highly recommended to readers interested in the lives of medieval people who were neither royalty nor members of the nobility, and who are all the more individual and interesting for that.”— Tinney S. Heath, 




Add caption




Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on WGDR 91.1 fm and  WGDH 91.7 fm, 
Goddard College's community radio station
in Plainfield, Vermont. 





 
  

13 February 2014

Carolyn Gage's Second Coming of Joan of Arc & A Brief Snippet :: Molly Antopol's The UnAmericans


4:00    Weather and Music 

4:15    Carolyn Gage's The Second Coming of Joan of Arc Part I
                                                                       (and a brief interview snippet)...

Carolyn Gage
Joan of Arc led an army to victory at seventeen. At eighteen, she arranged the coronation of a king. At nineteen, she went up against the entire Catholic church… and lost. Her trial lasted five months, and the testimony by witnesses was carefully transcribed by notaries. Twenty years after her death, a new trial was authorized, and again detailed records were kept. There was testimony by her childhood playmates, by her parents, by the women who slept with her, by the soldiers who served under her, by the priests who confessed her, by those who witnessed and administered her torture. She is the most thoroughly documented figure of the fifteenth century. So why do the myths about the simpleminded peasant girl, the pious virgin, still pervade the history books?



Joan was anorectic. She was a teenage runaway. She had an incestuous, alcoholic father. She loved women. She died for her right to wear men’s clothing. She was defiant, irreverent, more clever than her judges, unrepentant, and unfailingly true to her own visions.

In The Second Coming of Joan of Arc, Joan returns to share her story with contemporary women. She tells her experiences with the highest levels of church, state, and military, and unmasks the brutal misogyny behind male institutions.

                 
Molly Antopol (photo Debbi Cooper)
5:00     Molly Antopol

"Molly Antopol's The UnAmericans (WW Norton, 2014) is a stunning debut work of fiction that fearlessly exposes the deeply human emotions that both tie people together and break relationships apart. Deftly combining powerful narratives of men and women throughout generations with history spanning the twentieth century, Antopol's story collection moves from the United States to Israel to Soviet Russia and back again. Throughout the journey across continents, Antopol's host of rich characters struggle for relief in an unsettling world, hounded by forces outside of their control. Undertaking provocative topics such as religion, the collapse of Communism, Soviet repression and the intimacy of family relationships, Antopol's bold debut sears with despair, triumph, wisdom and passion.


             The UnAmericans opens with a recently divorced man in New York City who unexpectedly meets a younger, recently widowed woman in the story entitled “The Old World.” The two are immediately infatuated with one another in an all consuming whirlwind of fresh love and quickly marry. Yet, while honeymooning in the woman's native country of Ukraine, the couple immediately stumbles upon difficulties settling into their new life together and encounter emotional differences that extend beyond their recent romantic pasts, but rather confront their cultural comforts and expectations. Effortlessly opening an intimate window into the husband's quest to make sense of his new marriage, Antopol offers a compelling contemplation on the influence of culture and its power on the human connection.
            
           Moving to the backdrop of Israel, Antopol introduces a single mother and her two young adult sons in “Minor Heroics.” Despite the fact that the younger brother saves his older brother's life in an unfortunate accident, the older, decorated soldier brother must have a portion of his leg amputated, shattering his ability to continue his honored position in the Israeli Defense Forces. Now, the younger brother who had been living in his older brother's shadow is put in the unique position to help care for his family. Even amid such devastating circumstances, the brothers lose sight of what is truly important as they quarrel over their romantic desires and relationships.

            In “The Quietest Man,” an absentee father and former dissident from communist-era Prague needles his adult daughter for details of her newly commissioned play when he fears it casts him in an unflattering light. Paranoid that he will be perceived as “unsympathetic” or “unreliable,” allegiances are skewed as the father tries to learn the play's plot by inviting his daughter to visit from New York City at his home in Maine. As the father begins to uncover the true subject of the play, a turn of heart appears to occur yet it is unclear whether the father is more content with her daughter's perception of him or the way in which he will be presented to an audience. With conviction and vivid detail, Antopol explores the ubiquitous desire to feel relevant in the world and the lengths one will go to achieve it.

           The collection’s final story, “Retrospective,” is a tour de force that spans three generations of women across three continents, from World War II-era Paris to communist Moscow, and from 1970s Jerusalem to modern-day Boston. The story opens with the death of a famous dissident art collector grandmother that causes a young American woman and her Israeli husband to reconsider their marriage. Teeming with insecurities and the frightening reality of new beginnings, the closing section relays the consequences of concealing the truth not only from a partner but from oneself" (source).


Molly Antopol teaches writing at Stanford University, where she was a recent Wallace Stegner Fellow. A recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award, she holds an MFA from Columbia University and lives in San Francisco.



    Woman-Stirred Radio broadcasts live on
    WGDR 91.1 fm and WGDH 91.7 fm,
 
    Goddard College's community radio station
           located in Plainfield, Vermont.